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Pentagon Picked Four Tech Companies to Form $9B Cloud Computing Network


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The Pentagon.

The $9-billion contract is expected to be completed by June 2028 and will not be evenly split by Google, Oracle, Microsoft, and Amazon. Each company was guaranteed $100,000 and will have to bid for their piece of the rest.

Credit: Glowimages/Getty Images

In a press conference that Ars attended today, Department of Defense officials discussed the benefits of partnering with Google, Oracle, Microsoft, and Amazon to build the Pentagon's new cloud computing network. The multi-cloud strategy was described as a necessary move to keep military personnel current as technology has progressed and officials' familiarity with cloud technology has matured.

Air Force Lieutenant General Robert Skinner said that this Joint Warfighting Cloud Capability (JWCC) contract—worth $9 billion—would help quickly expand cloud capabilities across all defense departments. He described new accelerator capabilities like preconfigured templates and infrastructure as code that will make it so that even "people who don't understand cloud can leverage cloud" technologies. Such capabilities could help troops on the ground easily access data gathered by unmanned aircraft or space communications satellites.

"JWCC is a multiple-award contract vehicle that will provide the DOD the opportunity to acquire commercial cloud capabilities and services directly from the commercial Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) at the speed of mission, at all classification levels, from headquarters to the tactical edge," DOD's press release said.

Until now, officials did not have direct access to cloud providers, and military personnel located around the world didn't have cloud technology capable of providing access to files at all three classification levels: unclassified, secret, and top secret. With JWCC, that's changed, and now the defense department expects to be able to pass on intelligence more quickly.

From Ars Technica
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